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TESTIMONIALS & PRESS

 

What the Professionals Say about Our Gloves.

 

We do like the gloves so far. I definitely notice the difference compared to latex. They offer a better peace-of-mind knowing they create a better barrier. It seems to have taken care of the irritation/redness some of our people were experiencing. The officers really like these gloves, they like the way the gloves grip and that the gloves are thicker so they won’t tear. I think even our maintenance division ordered some from you as well.

Northwest Ohio Sheriff Office

 

I work for DHS. I recently used ResQGrip gloves at work. I was amazed at the performance from this glove. I pat-down/search subjects every night. I place/remove shackles and leg irons at least 20 times a shift. Some shift we do up to 120 times. I had my handcuffs get jammed and the glove never tore. My partner was removing shackles at one instance, the back of the handcuff key stabbed him in the palm of his hand and the glove never ripped.

During the time of shackling, we have to change out a pair of latex gloves at least 3 times. When we used the ResQGrip gloves, we never changed the first pair we put on. We even told each other, we did not want to throw them away. The gloves worked amazing!! My partner saved a pair to work on his personal vehicle at home. He used the same pair the whole time. I recommend these gloves to anyone that uses latex gloves on a daily/nightly basis. You will definitely want to invest in these gloves, you will not be disappointed at all!!!!

Manuel S., DHS

 

"Thank you for setting up your stand at the expo again this year.  I first picked up some samples of your ResQ-Grip gloves at the 2017 to put in my glove pouch, because lets face it what cop doesnít love free samples at the Expo right?  Our department buys the standard thick beige colored nitrile gloves but I wanted to try something different as they always tend to rip or pop when you put them on or start doing anything.  Your gloves have held up way better as I have yet to have one tear.  Especially now with the increase in fentanyl laced drugs hitting our area, I have switched to these gloves almost exclusively since I donít want gloves tearing on vehicle searches anymore.  And the textured surfaces are  great when trying to do searches and you have liquids covering items or on first aid calls and you have to work around fluids, I feel better knowing that Iím not going to lose grip because of the normal smooth glove getting slippery or possibly tearing while dealing with bodily fluids.  I will be looking to getting the department to switching over to your gloves as Iím sure other people will want to switch after I hand them out the samples I picked up this year.  Thanks again,"

Police Officer, PA

 

"Yes, I like them a lot better than the gloves we are using now.  I think they’re made by med express, they’re really not made for us.  Your gloves are way tough, I really like them, just yesterday I used them while trying to open a metal safe, they really hold up.  I’ve already passed my sentiments on to my boss regarding future purchases, I’m a Hazmat instructor and made the request from a BB pathogen / officer safety angle."

 J.E. - Ashville, NC

 

"I currently work as a Detective for the City of Monroe, Wisconsin.  Our Department has used the ResQ-Grip Glove since the middle of last year.  I have processed many scenes wearing the ResQ-Grip Gloves and numerous scenes involving bodily fluids.  The gloves seem to run a bit smaller than other gloves but hold up well and seem to grip wet or damp items well.  I will highly suggest these gloves to any law enforcement agency.  I was not disappointed nor other officers in my department.  Thank You ResQ-Grip…"

 Sgt. Dan - Monroe, WI

 

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Ohio Company Creates 'Fentanyl Proof' Gloves.



MINERVA, OH (WOIO) - October 25th, 2017 - Police officers put their lives at risk during drug arrests, getting exposed to dangerous chemicals. A local company is helping them stay safe. Summit Glove has designed and created ResQ-Grip. The nitrile glove is designed to protect against harsh chemicals. Most gloves are made from other materials, like latex. Account manager Matt Fox said the gloves could be a game changer for first responders:

"We're the first glove company that can go up to a police officer or sheriff and say this glove will hold up against fentanyl and we're pretty proud of that," he said. As opioid overdoes continue to rise all over the nation, Fox said these gloves could be used as the first line of protection for first responders.

In Ohio, more than 4,000 people died from drug overdoses in 2016, a record 36 percent increase from the previous year. "If you have an officer that's going out and they have to search through somebody's pocket and they're exposed to these dangerous drugs, they want to make sure that only that their officers are safe but that they're gonna come home," Fox said. The gloves range in price but are about $8-$10 for 100 gloves. And although first responders come to mind, the gloves are made for everyone. "They can actually wear this for changing out oil, if you clean a house, anything that you want to wear a glove for, this is the glove you can wear," he said.

Summit Glove is the first company in the country to do third party testing on the gloves.

Posted by Sia Nyorkor, Cleveland 19 Reporter

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Minerva Company Develops Fentanyl - Resistant Gloves.

MINERVA, OH (WHBC) - October 22nd, 2017 - A Stark County company is on the front lines in the battle against injury and even death from powerful drugs like fentanyl. PH&S Products in Minerva has added ResQ-Grip gloves to its glove collection. First responders can wear these gloves for an extended periods of time while in contact with fentanyl without suffering ill effects, based on testing. The company demonstrated the gloves this past weekend at a police chiefs conference in Philadelphia.

Jim Michaels interviews Matt Fox from PH&S Products about the NEW ResQ-Grip gloves and what it means for Police Officers, EMT's and First Responders.

Jim Michaels - Reporter/Anchor - 1480 WHBC Radio


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Traffic Stop Almost Turns Deadly for ELO Officer.

EAST LIVERPOOL — An hour after city Patrolman Chris Green responded Friday night with other officers to a traffic stop on Lisbon Street, he was being treated for a drug overdose. Green responded and assisted in searching the vehicle being driven by Justin Buckel (see accompanying story), where suspected drugs were scattered about inside.

“When I got to the scene, he was covered in it. I patted him down, and that was the only time I didn’t wear gloves. Otherwise, I followed protocol,” Green said. Within the past year, the department began providing special protective gear in the cruisers containing masks, gloves and other items for officers’ use due to the potentially lethal effects of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid 50 to 100 times more potent than morphine, and carfentanyl, used as an animal sedative and said to be 10,000 times more potent than morphine.

About an hour after officers had returned to the police station with the suspects and the seized evidence, Buckel indicated he was not feeling well, and an ambulance was called. “That saved my life,” Green said. Officers were standing about, just talking when someone pointed out to Green he had something — the suspected drug residue — on his shirt, and he swiped at it with his hand, wiping it off.

Within a few minutes, Green said, “I started talking weird. I slowly felt my body shutting down. I could hear them talking, but I couldn’t respond. I was in total shock. ‘No way I’m overdosing,’ I thought.” Patrolman Rob Smith grabbed Green as he began to fall to the floor, and the ambulance crew already there for Buckel began working on Green, quickly administering him a dose of the opioid antidote Narcan.

“Apparently, I was in denial. I denied the Narcan,” Green said, until other officers insisted and eventually, at the hospital, three additional doses had to be given to completely revive him. “God was surely looking over me,” Green said.

Chief John Lane agreed, saying his officer is lucky the effects hit him before he left the station that night.

“If he would have been alone, he would have been dead. That’s how dangerous this stuff is. What if he went home and got it on his family members?” Lane pointed out the car had child safety seats in the rear seat and the mother had come to the station in an attempt to retrieve it after the traffic stop, but he said efforts will be made to keep the vehicle from being used to transport children again.

“We’re going to try and seize that car and destroy it. How do we neutralize it? It only takes one granule (of carfentanyl) to kill an adult. These people have no regard for anybody, not themselves, not the police, not their kids,” Lane said. “Their priority is not about anything but that next high.” Green was treated and released Friday, and when contacted Saturday said he was still feeling the effects of the substance, saying his head “feels like it’s in a vice grip, my heart feels like I got kicked in the chest and my stomach feels like I have a case of the flu. I can’t wrap my head around (why anyone would take the drugs).” He said the passenger in Buckel’s vehicle also ended up taken to the hospital, which was not confirmed Saturday, and said the clothes he was wearing Friday night had to be thrown away.

Green said Saturday afternoon he expects felonious assault charges could be charged in relation to the exposure from the suspected drugs. He said these powerful drugs “are not only killing the people willing to shove it into their own veins, now they’re killing people like me and my family.” Service-Safety Director Brian Allen said Saturday evening, “We take the safety of our officers very seriously and will do our best to protect them. I was very impressed with the quick response of our other officers and emergency personnel.” Allen added, “It’s time our state gets tough on those who peddle this poison and creates laws to protect those who protect us.”

Morning Journal
jgilbert@mojonews.com


 

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